A Big Announcement and a Tip for Properly Handling a Spring Veggie Fav

Spring has sprung and so has my latest project!

Hello hello!

Let’s get right into it—the *Big Announcement* I teased in the clickbait-y subject of this email is this: my newest e-book, In Harmony: Spring is officially available for purchase! It’s part three of a four-part seasonally-focused meal prep-friendly recipe series that I’ve been working on for nearly a year now. These recipes are as approachable as they are delicious and really drive at the goal of all my work: to get you excited to get into your kitchen cooking health-supportive, tasty food. As I’m sure you can tell, I’m stoked about and really proud of this project and am absolutely dying for you to get your hands on these recipes. As such, I’m offering a 10% discount for the first week of sales. Woohoo! Sales!!

Grab Your Discounted Copy Here

On top of the week one discount, paid newsletter subscribers are receiving a code for an additional 20% off any of my e-books. If you love deals and are considering upgrading to the paid sub, now would be the time to do it!

Upgrade Your Subscription Here

Today’s tip is, unsurprisingly, tied directly to the e-book launch. I mean, what kind of solopreneur would I be if that weren’t the case? That said, this tip has been on my list to share with you since the very inception of this newsletter, so it’s definitely worthwhile, even without its relation to my e-book. Today I’m sharing my very simple method for trimming asparagus and one of my favorite recipes from In Harmony: Spring which is, of course, asparagus centric. Alright, thanks for bearing with me through my little 80’s infomercial marketing moment (“buy now for your 10% discount” am I right?). Let’s get into today’s tip.

To trim asparagus’ woody ends perfectly every single time (Hallelujah, no more tough, fibrous bites!) use your hands...

That’s right, the best way to trim asparagus doesn’t actually involve trimming at all. It’s all about using your hands. Asparagus naturally breaks at just the right point, exactly where the edible part of the stalk stops and the woody part begins.


Here’s how:

  1. Gather and clean your asparagus (they always need a good rinse because they grow in sand). Place one hand toward the middle of a single asparagus stalk and the other down at the root end (the end that doesn’t have that pretty layered part associated with asparagus).

  2. Bend the stalk, applying gentle pressure. The stalk will naturally break wherever the woody, unpleasant part of the vegetable ends and the tender, edible part begins. It may seem like you’re breaking off a lot, but trust me, you’re removing a portion of the veggie you wouldn’t want to eat anyway!

  3. Continue, one at a time until you’ve finished the entire bunch. It’s a little more time consuming than cutting the whole bunch at once, but you’re left with a much better product, I promise.

  4. Prepare your asparagus to your liking. Might I recommend my recipe from In Harmony: Spring for Honey Mustard Seared Asparagus? This link will take you to a sneak peak of one of my favorite recipes from the e-book. And here’s a handy GIF if you’d like a visual of this super simple asparagus tip


So, to summarize everything we’ve covered today: there’s really no need for a knife when it comes to trimming asparagus, I want you to get comfy in the kitchen and I think the recipes in In Harmony: Spring are going to help you do that, and finally, I’m offering not one but two (whoops, there goes my infomercial persona again) ways to grab it at a discounted price. As always, if you have any questions, please feel free to reach out. You can respond to this email or DM me on Instagram. And if you do end up purchasing In Harmony: Spring (yay!), I’d love to hear about and/or see what you’re cooking. Tag me on Instagram or shoot me a photo here by responding to this email.

With Love and a Tip of my Chef’s Hat,

Erica

Want more? I’m so flattered! You can also follow me on Instagram or check out my blog where you can find my tip-laden e-book collection.